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Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

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Published21 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Published23 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Published20 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Published20 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Published20 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Kate Winslet on why she paid family’s £17,000 energy bill

BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Published21 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Kate Winslet has revealed she donated £17,000 to pay a soaring energy bill for a child’s life support after being deeply moved by her family’s plight.Carolynne Hunter was warned by Clackmannanshire Council that her bill could hit the high sum next year.Her daughter Freya, 13, has severe cerebral palsy and relies on receiving oxygen for chronic breathing problems.The Oscar-winning actress said the original BBC Scotland story “absolutely destroyed me”. Ms Hunter said she was reduced to tears by Winslet’s intervention.Who needs to ‘step up’ to keep kids safe online?Kate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy billMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl aliveThe Hollywood star was asked about her donation on the BBC’s Sunday with Laura Kuenssberg.On how she heard about it, Winslet told the programme: “Something popped up on the BBC Scotland news page about this woman, Carolynne Hunter’s story. “And her saying that she would have to put her child, who has severe cerebral palsy and very, very extreme needs and is non-verbal, that she was going to have to put her child into care because she could not afford her electricity bills. “And it absolutely destroyed me. I just thought on what planet is anyone going to let that happen, this is completely, completely wrong.” After reading the story last month Winslet said she was determined to do something about it.The actress added: “We were able to track her down and say that I had wanted to make a donation, and it was because of that that they then set up a GoFundMe page, and bang, I was able to do it right away. “And it just felt – I just – it was just wrong to me that this woman was going to suffer and that she should have been in any way as a mother forced to make such a heart-breaking decision because she simply didn’t have the support and couldn’t pay the bills. “I just couldn’t let that happen.”Asked by Laura Kuenssberg what the story said about the UK as a country, Winslet replied: “I think we just – I mean, people just – the powers that be need to have a good think and they need to get it right. “And they need to make changes that will actually help these people.”‘Very little support’She said adults have always been great at fundraising for groups, other adults and large groups of children. But Winslet added: “I have always been really cut in half by the plight of the individual. “And there seems to be very little support for individuals whose situations are extreme.”The actress’ new film, I am Ruth, focuses on protecting young people from social media. And Winslet told the programme the government should make social media firms enforce age limits to help tackle their impact on children’s mental health.She also praised England footballer Marcus Rashford’s “extraordinary” campaign to ensure no child in need went hungry during the pandemic. On Sunday, Ms Hunter told BBC Reporting Scotland about the moment GoFundMe informed her about the actress’ donation.She said: “When they contacted me to say that Kate Winslet wanted to help our family I actually could not believe it.”I was kind of in shock. It was a wee bit surreal.”When she later discovered the Titanic star had pledged £17,000, Ms Hunter said: “I just cried.”She added: “What Kate has done is she has recognised Freya in a society and a world that Freya is very hidden.”Life is not accessible for Freya because she has such a high level of medical need.”Lifesaving donationsMs Hunter, 49, also said the prospect of her daughter having to leave the family home if they could not not afford their energy bills was “unthinkable”.She said: “I know that the reason Freya is here today is the love and care that we provide here at home to keep her comfortable and happy.”That would not be happening in hospital or residential care. I don’t think Freya would survive.”Everybody who has donated and helped Freya have saved her life.”The Hunters live in a large council house in Tillicoultry – which is not energy efficient – so there is space for Freya’s equipment.At present it costs them £6,500 a year to run the kit and heat the home – though Ms Hunter said she had turned the heating off in most rooms to save money.Although she works full time on a moderate wage, she does not receive the same support as those on low incomes.Read more stories from Tayside and CentralMs Hunter also worries that possible winter power cuts in the event of reduced gas supply – a result of Russia’s war on Ukraine – could put Freya’s care at risk.In addition to cerebral palsy, Freya relies on receiving oxygen for breathing problems – particularly through the night.The family require help from at least two NHS nurses or staff from self-directed support (SDS) – a form of social care.Staff monitor Freya’s heart rate as well as oxygen levels and carry out frequent suctioning to keep her airways clear.In recent months Freya’s room was the only one to be heated in order to keep her and her staff comfortable – but Ms Hunter said they have had to cut back.Before Winslet’s donation, Ms Hunter said her biggest worry was facing fuel poverty amid the cost of living crisis.Ms Hunter also said she would like to see Scottish and UK governments stepping in to support families with care responsibilities who may end up struggling.More on this storyKate Winslet covers mum’s £17,000 energy bill11 NovemberMum faces £17,000 energy bill to keep girl alive19 October

Two men guilty of abuse at Kerelaw residential school

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Published8 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingTwo men have been found guilty of a catalogue of physical and sexual abuse against vulnerable children over three decades at a former council-run residential school.It is the second time Matthew George and John Muldoon have been convicted of offences against teenagers at Kerelaw School in Stevenston, North Ayrshire. Former art teacher George, 73, was convicted of 39 offences while Muldoon, 69, who worked in the school’s secure unit, was found guilty of 16.The High Court in Glasgow heard George committed offences against 21 victims while Muldoon targeted nine children. Both men will be sentenced next month.More on this storyClaims of pupil ‘abuse’ disputed18 January 2012Abuse teacher loses second appeal25 August 2011Jail terms for school abuse pair1 June 2006

Royal Mail says people should send Christmas post early

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Published46 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesRoyal Mail has asked customers to post Christmas mail earlier than usual due to strike action by postal workers.It has brought forward the final suggested date for sending second class post to 12 December from 19 December, and for first class to 16 December from 21 December.Six days of strike action by CWU union members are due in December as part of a dispute over pay and conditions.Royal Mail said it was trying to keep mail moving in the busy festive period.It has also brought forward the final recommended date for sending international mail to 3 December from 10 December for places including Greece, Eastern Europe and Turkey.Members of the CWU union are due to strike on 9, 11, 14, 15, 23 and 24 December.Royal Mail: When are the postal strikes ahead of Christmas?Nick Landon, Royal Mail’s chief commercial officer, said the CWU was “striking at our busiest time, holding Christmas to ransom for our customers, businesses and families across the country”.He apologised for any disruption, and said Royal Mail was asking customers to post early “to help us deliver Christmas”.Laura Joseph, Post Office customer experience director, warned that “December 12 is now likely to be even busier in Post Office branches as customers race to take advantage of the cheaper [second class] postage” and she urged people to post parcels as soon as possible.The CWU has been approached for comment.About 115,000 CWU members are taking part in the dispute, which is partly over pay.The union says the latest Royal Mail pay offer of 9% spread over two years lags behind the pace of price rises, which is currently more than 11%.Royal Mail’s pay offer is also tied to changes to working conditions including start times and compulsory Sunday working which the CWU has described as the “Uberisation” of the postal service.More on this storyWhat are the new dates for sending Christmas post?2 hours agoRoyal Mail staff to strike in run-up to Christmas17 November

Heathrow faces pre-Christmas baggage handlers strike

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Published47 minutes agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, PA MediaPre-Christmas travellers using Heathrow airport later this month face disruption after baggage handlers voted to strike from 16 December. The 72-hour strike action will affect flights operated by 10 major airlines from Heathrow Terminals 2, 3 and 4. The dispute centres around a pay offer made to cargo workers but which has not been extended to baggage handlers. The Unite union said ground-handling workers at Menzies Aviation have not received a “fair” pay offer. “Menzies has made a fair pay offer to one group of its workers but isn’t prepared to make a similar offer to its ground handlers,” said Unite general secretary Sharon Graham. Miguel Gomez Sjunnesson, executive vice president Europe at Menzies Aviation said: “We are well prepared for further industrial action and are working closely with key partners to put in place robust contingency plans.”We remain committed to seeking a resolution on the pay talks in our ground handling operations so our employees can receive their increase now, and hope to be able to reach an agreement which is workable for both the business and our employees during our meeting with unions on Tuesday.” Why are so many workers going on strike? Airlines that are likely to be affected by the three-day strike are Air Canada, American Airlines, Lufthansa, Swiss Air, Air Portugal, Austrian Airlines, Qantas, Egypt Air, Aer Lingus and Finnair. The dispute involves 350 workers employed by Menzies who were offered a lower pay deal than cargo workers employed by the company. Cargo workers were offered a 9.5% pay increase backdated to May 2022 and a further 1% from January 2023, the union said. “The Menzies ground handlers have been offered a flat rate increase which for all the workforce amounts to a real terms pay cut while the real inflation rate (RPI) currently stands at 14.2%,” the union added. The action follows a similar dispute in November when a three-day strike hit passengers at the airport. The strike would have been more widespread with twice as many ground-handling staff planning to walk out last month until rival transport handling company Dnata agreed an improved pay offer for its 350 workers at Heathrow. Menzies Aviation said the strike in November involved about 250 of the company’s 1,500 ground handling workforce at Heathrow and had minimal impact on operations. A Heathrow spokesperson said the airport was “aware of industrial action proposed by Menzies colleagues”. It said it “encouraged airport partners who would be affected to continue with their contingency planning and we will support them to minimise the impact on passengers, should the strike go ahead.” More on this storyWorkers at Heathrow to strike in World Cup run-up4 NovemberWhy are so many workers going on strike?2 days ago

Strep A: Fourth child dies from bacterial disease

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Published56 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, GoogleA fourth child has died after contracting Strep A, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has confirmed.The latest death from the bacterial disease was of a child who attended St John’s School in Ealing, west London.It has also been confirmed a boy aged four from High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire died with Strep A last month. The two other children to have died were primary school pupils in Penarth, Vale of Glamorgan, and in Ashford, Surrey.The Group A Streptococcal (GAS) infection can cause scarlet fever.However, the UKHSA told the BBC it was important people understand scarlet fever is a mild illness and the GAS bacteria which causes it only rarely becomes invasive, leading to serious illness.The UKHSA said it was working with Ealing Council to provide public health advice and support to the school.What is Strep A?Image source, BSIP/Getty ImagesGroup A streptococcal (GAS) infection is caused by strains of the streptococcus pyogenes bacteriumThe bacteria can live on hands or the throat for long enough to allow easy spread between people through sneezing, kissing and skin contactMost infections cause mild illnesses such as “strep throat”, scarlet fever or skin infectionsThe bacteria rarely infects healthy people but if it does get into the body, causing serious and even life-threatening conditions it is known as invasive GAS (iGAS).You can read more about Strep A here.Dr Yimmy Chow, health protection consultant at UKHSA London, said: “We are extremely saddened to hear about the death of a child at St John’s Primary School, and our thoughts are with their family, friends and the school community.”Working with Ealing Council public health team, we have provided precautionary advice to the school community to help prevent further cases and we continue to monitor the situation closely.”Strep A: Why it can be dangerous and what to know The UKHSA said the symptoms of Group A streptococcal infection include a sore throat, fever and minor skin infections, and can be treated with a full course of antibiotics prescribed by a GP.”In rare incidences, it can be a severe illness and anyone with high fever, severe muscle aches, pain in one area of the body and unexplained vomiting or diarrhoea should call NHS 111 and seek medical help immediately,” Dr Chow added.Follow BBC London on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Send your story ideas to [email protected] on this storyPrimary school pupil dies after catching disease18 hours agoPupil dies after primary school bacteria outbreak24 NovemberRelated Internet LinksNHS scarlet fever symptomsThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Newry: Man dies after being shot multiple times at close range

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Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Pacemaker A 58-year-old man killed in Newry was shot number of times at close range as part of a possible feud, police say.The shooting occurred in Ardcarn Park, a residential area, shortly after 18:00 GMT on Thursday. The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. His name has not been released.Police say one line of inquiry is that the shooting was part of a cross-border crime feud, possibly involving drugs, and a murder investigation has been launched. The killing was a “brutal and a senseless attack on a defenceless man”, Supt Norman Haslett said on Friday.He said the 58-year-old victim, who was a husband and father, crashed his car into a nearby property after the attack.Earlier reports suggest the victim was shot a number of times as he stood behind his car.At the scene: Kelly Bonner, BBC News NIShocking and brutal – that’s how this killing has been described. Neighbours describe hearing what they thought was fireworks going off, only to realise someone had been killed outside their door.Police and forensics remain at the scene trying to establish what happened here. Local politicians have roundly condemned the attack and urged anyone with any information to get in contact with the police.SDLP councillor for the area Michael Savage denounced what he called “a reckless act… when families would have been about”.Sinn Féin assembly member Liz Kimmins said: “This was a very brutal killing and a family have now been left grieving and the community left very, very frightened. “It’s just horrendous news. There’s just absolutely no room for this type of criminality on our streets and those responsible have nothing to offer.”Ulster Unionist leader Doug Beattie described the murder as terrible. “More guns on our streets, more victims, more families grieving. Senseless, just senseless,” he tweeted.Alliance Policing Board member Nuala McAllister said: “This is a call back to the dark old days and we cannot allow those who want to drag us back to the past to do so.”Image source, Pacemaker

Chester by-election: Sunak fails first by-election test, says Rayner

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Published2 hours agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Rishi Sunak has “failed” his first electoral test as Labour held Chester in a by-election with an increased vote share, Angela Rayner has said.Labour’s deputy leader said voters “have given a big message to the Conservatives that they want change”.Samantha Dixon was elected with a 10,974 majority, and a 61% vote share – Labour’s best ever result in the seat.Repeating the 13.6% swing from the Tories nationally would win Labour a majority, pollster John Curtice said.Culture Secretary Michelle Donelan said that the result was “pretty much expected”.Ms Donelan argued the Conservative Party was “focused on delivering for the British public”.Lord Hayward, a Conservative peer and elections analyst, said: “Rishi has to convince the public at large that he can manage out of this crisis, whichever crisis one’s looking at – and there’s a lot of them.”Nine candidates run to replace code-breach MPLabour MP quits over sexual misconductChester by-election candidates’ ‘minute manifestos’Ms Rayner said Chester voters had shown they “want a Labour government”.Labour Leader Keir Starmer, called the election “a very, very good result for the Labour Party”.Sir Keir said: The Labour Party has been putting forward a positive plan for the future, how we stabilise and grow our economy.”The government is worn out, tired and crashed the economy and the verdict was very clearly given.”In her victory speech, Ms Dixon said voters had delivered a message to Mr Sunak that the Conservatives “no longer have a mandate to govern”.Labour had been expected to retain the seat, which it won in 2019 by a majority of 6,164. In that election, the Conservatives came second, winning 38% of the vote. Labour and the Liberal Democrats secured 50% and 7% respectively.This time around, Ms Dixon won with a 61% share, easily defeating Conservative Liz Wardlaw on a 41% turnout.Bleak outlook for Tories Very little about this result is surprising, but that doesn’t mean it’s not significant. Labour held the seat and boosted their share of the vote, while support for the Conservatives dropped. Sir Keir Starmer can point to this win as evidence that Labour’s lead in the opinion polls is reflected in the real world. Conservatives say they’ve been given a “bloody nose”, as is often the case for governments mid-term, and a message from voters that they need to deliver. Labour insiders are talking up the win as a “thumping result”, with the party’s biggest ever majority in the city of Chester.But Tories in the region, braced for defeat, say with some relief that it could’ve been worse. It’s always risky projecting by-election results onto the national picture – but as a snapshot, this one tells us Labour has built on its support in a seat that’s been Conservative in the past and for the Tories, the electoral outlook is bleak. Sir John Curtice told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “Labour are in a stronger position than they have been at any point in the last 12 years.”The 13.6% swing from Conservatives to Labour would be enough for Labour to form a new government, Sir John said, but “wouldn’t produce an enormous majority” were it to be replicated in a general election.This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.The contest was triggered by the resignation of previous Labour MP Christian Matheson.He stood down after Parliament’s watchdog recommended his suspension for “serious sexual misconduct”.The Conservatives have performed badly in recent by-elections, losing Wakefield to Labour and the historically safe Tory seat of Tiverton and Honiton to the Liberal Democrats. Those defeats increased political pressure on Boris Johnson, who later resigned as prime minister.Thursday’s by-election was the first to take place since Mr Johnson quit and his successor Liz Truss caused market turbulence with her mini-Budget. AnalysisBy Kaleigh Watterson, Cheshire political reporterEven though it wasn’t a completely unexpected result, people from the Labour Party here in Chester are very happy with a near 11,000 majority. This has been a Labour seat since 2015 and, out speaking to people on the streets, there were more people saying they were going to vote for them.The Labour campaign was a lot more active too. We saw a lot of shadow ministers coming to visit – big hitters like Shadow Chancellor Rachel Reeves and former leader Ed Miliband.Sam Dixon – a former leader of Cheshire West and Chester Council – was keen to showcase her local links.That localness has mattered – some of the candidates told me the first question asked of them was: “Are you from Chester?” With a Conservative candidate living in a neighbouring council area and minimal ministerial visits, the question can be asked: Did the Conservatives really have their heart in this one? Results in full:Samantha Dixon (Labour) 17,309 (60.8%, +11.1%)Liz Wardlaw (Conservative) 6,335 (22.20%, -16.1%)Rob Herd (Liberal Democrat) 2,368 (8.37%, +1.53%)Paul Bowers (Green) 987 (2.78%, +0.2%)Jeanie Barton (Reform UK) 773 (2.73%, +0.2%)Richard Hewison (Rejoin EU) 277 (0.98%)Cain Griffiths (UK Independence Party) 179 (0.63%)Howling Laud Hope (Official Monster Raving Loony Party) 156 (0.55%)Chris Quartermaine (Freedom Alliance) 91 (0.32%)More on this storyRayner in Chester: Sunak failed in first test as leader. Video, 00:01:43Rayner in Chester: Sunak failed in first test as leader5 hours ago1:43Labour MP quits over sexual misconduct21 OctoberChester by-election candidates’ ‘minute manifestos’5 days ago

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